Loading documents to pCloud

Looking for Documents

Generally you will need to search for copies of relevant documents you may find on your computer or phone, or in your paper files, or documents you may be able to obtain from elsewhere - such as from public records. It is a matter of searching and seeing what you can find and then loading the documents to pCloud. 

Note: documents loaded to pCloud are generally stored on servers outside the United Kingdom.




Create a folder in pCloud and "invite" me to share the folder. To do this, tap "Share" and then "Invite to folder" selecting the "can view" option, so that I can see the documents which you will be loading to that folder.


Load relevant documents to the pCloud folder




Now load relevant documents to the pCloud folder. How to load various kinds of documents including photos, emails, and paper documents, is explained below. 


Load photos etc from your phone to the pCloud folder

Load any relevant digital photos (JPG files) on your phone (and any relevant videos or audio files) to the folder on pCloud. It is best to load photos, videos, and audio files direct from your phone (if that is what they were captured on) using the pCloud app to ensure the photos etc. are exactly as taken complete with EXIF data. Often people upload photos from their phone to their computer and rename the JPG files on their computer to give them descriptive names - e.g. "photo of garden". If you have done this don't load the copy of the JPG file from your computer to pCloud but rather load the original JPG file direct from your phone. Of course if you took a photo some time ago and the phone you took it on has since been broken and all you have is the renamed copy on your computer you should load that to pCloud, but for preference you should load the original JPGs on your phone direct to the pCloud folder. Do not rename the JPG etc files on pCloud: leave them with the original names they were loaded with: if it is necessary to provide descriptions of photos, videos etc. (not always necessary because sometimes photos speak for themselves, but if you judge it necessary) write the descriptions in a Word document rather than adding descriptions to the JPG, MP3 or MP4 etc. file names. 

If you have relevant text message on your phone, copies of those text messages should also be loaded to the pCloud folder. Creating copies of text messages on your phone may not be straightforward, and often the easiest way to do this is to display the relevant text messages on your phone, take a screenshot, and then load the screenshot JPG file to the pCloud folder. How to initiate a screenshot on a phone depends on what phone model it is but on iPhones it is usually pressing the home button and power button at the same time. On Android phones it is often pressing the volume down button and power button at the same time. When taking screenshots you can capture all of the text messages you have exchanged with each correspondent, in one go in a single JPG, by pressing the scroll capture button to scroll through, and capture, the entire message display. Then load those JPGs (one for each person you have exchanged messages with) to the pCloud folder.


Load emails to the pCloud folder

You should load relevant emails to the pCloud folder. If the emails happen to be in Gmail you can sign on to Gmail and create a copy of the relevant emails in an MBOX file on your computer, and then load the MBOX file to the folder in pCloud. Otherwise (or if you prefer) you can use Outlook (or Apple Mail on a Mac) to create EML/MSG copies of emails. Simply click and drag the emails from Outlook or Apple Mail into the folder in pCloud.

When you drag emails from Outlook the email files (MSG files if you are using Windows or EML files on a Mac) will all have a "date modified" date of today's date (i.e. the date/time you dragged the email) not the date/time the email was originally composed and sent, but don't be concerned about that. Because the date/time sent is recorded in a standard form within each EML/MSG file I will be able to read the EML/MSG files, using the PSTViewer app, in date/time order. 


Load other relevant files on your computer to the pCloud folder 

Load other relevant documents on your computer to the folder on pCloud. 

When you have loaded the documents to pCloud, check that the "date modified" dates for the documents in the pCloud folder are the same as on your computer. Some cloud storage systems set the "date modified" for files to the date the file is uploaded but pCloud should preserve the "date modified" date for each file so that it is the same as the original "date modified" for the file on your computer. 

It is important to check this because I will be using the "date modified" to find and read files in order. The "date modified" might not, in every case, be the exact original date of the document - e.g. if you scanned in a letter a little while after you received it in the post - but even if it is only approximate it helps. 


Load PDF copies of paper documents to the pCloud folder

If you have relevant paper documents then you should scan them in as PDFs and load the PDFs to the folder on pCloud. Give each PDF a name which commences with the date of the document in year-month-day sequence like this:

2017-11-18 Letter Smith to Jones 

This is important because the "date modified" for each PDF will be today's date (the date you created the PDF by scanning in the document) and so will not be of any assistance in finding and reading these documents in sequence.  

The date at the front of the file name in yyyy-mm-dd form should always be the date the document was created/signed. For most documents there is no need to indicate in addition, in brackets at the end of the file name, when a document was received by you but very occasionally this might be important as well. 

If the document is A3 or larger, indicate the page size at the end of the PDF file name like this

1950-12-15 Conveyance from Smith to Jones - A3 

so that if and when someone comes to print the PDF the correct size paper can be used (old documents are unlikely to be exactly A3, A2, etc because these are modern page sizes but chose the nearest equivalent so that when the document is printed it can be easily read).  



To scan in paper documents you can either use a scanner or else use the Genius Scan app on your phone.  

Method 1: Use your scanner  

If a document consists of more than one page, make sure that all pages of the document are scanned into a single PDF. Don't produce a separate PDF for each page as it makes it difficult to read a document if you have to keep closing one PDF and opening another to read through a document. If you put all the pages of a document in the document feeder of your scanner they should, by default, be scanned into a single multi-page PDF. If you are not using the document feeder but are instead putting each page of a document, in turn, on the glass (e.g. because the document is in booklet form) the scanning dialogue you use should prompt you after scanning each page to say whether there are more pages of the document to be scanned (or whether the page you have just scanned is the last page of that document) so that it knows to include the next page in the same PDF as the preceding pages.  

If you have a very old scanner which does not have a document feeder and does not prompt you when scanning from the glass, so that you have no choice, when using that scanner, but to produce separate PDFs for each page of a multiple-page document, then you can merge those multiple PDFs into a single PDF containing all the pages of the document before loading that single multi-page PDF to the pCloud folder. One of the easiest ways to merge PDFs is to use Sejda Merge. 


Method 2: Use Genius Scan on your phone

Install the Genius Scan app on your phone. Make sure you take each image in a bright environment and check the quality before loading the PDF to pCloud.  
 

   
Don't scan in two pages side-by-side

If you have a document in leaflet form - e.g. a single A3 sheet of paper folded in half to make a four page A4 sized leaflet - make sure you scan each page (rather than scanning two pages side by side) so that you produce a PDF containing four A4 pages (and not two A3 pages).

So don't scan it in like this
 


Scan it in like this

          

with any backsheet at the end.

Similarly, if you have a booklet consisting e.g. of 8 A4 pages made up of two folded A3 sheets stapled at the crease, make sure you scan each page so that you produce a PDF containing eight A4 pages (and not four A3 pages).


Load PDF copies of old paper/card photos to the pCloud folder

If you have relevant old photos in paper/card form you need to scan in each one as a PDF as explained above giving it a PDF name commencing with the date of the photo - you probably won't know the exact date so name it to make this clear - e.g.

1992   Photo of No 22 garden - circa 1992  
1994-04   Photo of No 22 garden - circa spring 1994 
1995-08   Photo of No 22 garden - circa August 1995


If the photo is smaller than A4 size (as most photos are) place a piece of blank A4 paper on top of the photo (and position the photo in the centre of the A4 paper) on the scanner glass so as to produce an A4 PDF with the photo in the centre

If there is any information written on the reverse of the photo, and the photo is less than A5 size, photocopy the reverse side onto the bottom half of an A4 piece of paper, then place the photo on the scanner glass, with the photocopied sheet on top of it, so as to produce an A4 PDF with the photo in the middle of the top half of the A4 page and the reverse side in the middle of the bottom half of the A4 page.

If there is information written on the reverse of the photo, and the photo is greater than A5 size, scan in the photo, and its reverse side, as a two page PDF.

Load the PDF to the pCloud folder. 

Note: the reason why you should scan in paper/card photos as PDFs, rather than as JPG files, is that if you scan in photos as JPG files your scanner will probably add the date you scan them in as the "date taken" in the JPG file EXIF data. This can be confusing because the JPG file might later be wrongly thought to be a digital photo taken on that date when, in fact, it is merely a recently scanned copy of a non-digital photo taken at an earlier date.


Obtaining PDFs of or from websites and loading them to the pCloud folder

Loading PDF documents from official websites to the pCloud folder

If, in the past, you have obtained relevant documents (generally they will be in PDF form) direct from an official website such as the Land Registry, Companies House, or from a local council (e.g. planning permission documents), they will already be on your computer and you will have already loaded them to the folder on pCloud in the "Load emails to the pCloud folder" or "Load other relevant files on your computer to the pCloud folder" steps above. 

But if you are now, as part of seeking legal advice, or preparing to seek legal advice, on the disputed matter, obtaining relevant documents direct from an official website such as the Land Registry, Companies House, or from a local council (e.g. planning permission documents), you should, when loading them to a folder on pCloud give the PDF a name commencing with the date of the document. This is because the copy of the document on your computer (received by email after submitting a request on the official website, or downloaded direct from the website) will have a "date modified" of today's date (the date you downloaded it) not the date of the document itself, and so will not be of any assistance in finding and reading documents in sequence. You therefore need to give each PDF you are now obtaining direct from an official website and loading to the folder in pCloud a file name containing the document date as explained below.

An Official Copy of a document provided by the Land Registry will either have a title page saying that the official copy follows this page or the document will be stamped on the first page with an Official Copy or Office Copy stamp, and (in either case) on the first page should be a Title Number which will usually be in the form AB123456. Land Registry official copies like this should be named commencing with the date of the document in year-month-day sequence followed by the Title Number like this:

2010-05-11 AB123456 Transfer

2017-08-03 AB123456 Transfer

2017-10-27 AB123456 Transfer

2017-06-22 AB123456 Register of Title  

2017-06-22 AB123456 Title Plan


Planning permission documents should be named starting with the planning application reference number.

2016-12345 Application Form

2016-12345 Grant of Planning Permission

2016-12345 Plan 106 Rev B

2016-12345 Plan 112 Rev A

The planning application number, which is allocated by the planning authority when an application is received, will consist of the year and a number allocated serially for applications received that year - e.g. 2016-12345. Sometimes, for administrative convenience, other letters and numbers are added by the planning authority so that the application reference is quite lengthy but for the purposes of naming the file it is only the year and serial number which is used. The full year number should always be used - i.e. even if the planning authority uses a shortened year number such as 16/123456, you should use the full year number 2016-123456 when naming the file.



Loading PDF copies of Street View images to the pCloud folder

If, in the past, you have saved relevant Street View images on your computer you will have already loaded them to the folder on pCloud in the "Load other relevant files on your computer to the pCloud folder" step above. 

But if you are now, as part of seeking legal advice, or preparing to seek legal advice, on the disputed matter, obtaining relevant Street View images, you should, when creating the PDF copy to load to the folder on pCloud give the PDF a name commencing with the year and month of the image. This is because the PDF you create will have a "date modified" of today's date (the date you downloaded it) not the date of the image itself, and so will not be of any assistance in finding and reading documents in sequence. 

Make a PDF copy using the Print function on Chrome on a Windows computer. An example of how this is done for Street View can be seen here. Then load the PDF to the pCloud folder. Give the PDF a name commencing with the date of the image - you probably won't know the exact date so name it to make this clear - e.g.

2018-06   Street View Image of No 22 - circa June 2018 


You may be thinking that instead of doing the above it would be easier just to send me a URL link to the Street View web page but there are good reasons why you need to create a PDF, and load that to the pCloud folder (which you have previously given me a share link to) rather than send me a link to the StreetView web page. One reason is that, even though you may not be thinking of litigation at this stage, litigation at some point is always a possibility and you need to make sure that you have your own copies of all relevant web pages because their contents may change in the future (e.g. historical images may be removed from the website after a period of time). 


Loading PDF copies of Google Earth images to the pCloud folder

If, in the past, you have saved relevant Google Earth images on your computer you will have already loaded them to the folder on pCloud in the "Load other relevant files on your computer to the pCloud folder" step above. 

But if you are now, as part of seeking legal advice, or preparing to seek legal advice, on the disputed matter, obtaining relevant Google Earth images, you should, when creating the PDF copy to load to the folder on pCloud give the PDF a name commencing with the year and month of the image. This is because the PDF you create will have a "date modified" of today's date (the date you downloaded it) not the date of the image itself, and so will not be of any assistance in finding and reading documents in sequence. 

To create a PDF copy of a Google Earth image on a Windows computer, take a screen print (i.e. press ALT-Print Screen) of the image, paste the screen print into an app (e.g. Word) and save as a PDF as explained here. Then load the PDF to the folder on pCloud. Give the PDF a name commencing with the date of the image - you probably won't know the exact date so name it to make this clear - e.g.

2018-06   Google Earth Image of No 22 - circa June 2018 

You may be thinking that instead of doing the above it would be easier just to send me a URL link so that I can look for myself on Google Earth, but there are good reasons why you need to create a PDF, and load that to the pCloud folder (which you have previously given me a share link to) rather than send me a link to Google Earth. One reason is that, even though you may not be thinking of litigation at this stage, litigation at some point is always a possibility and you need to make sure that you have your own copies of all relevant web pages because their contents may change in the future. Google is gradually acquiring historical images from various sources so the image displayed for a particular time period may actually change as a decision is made to use a better quality recently acquired image in place of the image previously displayed (but the previous generally lower quality image may actually happen to show some particular feature you are interested in better).


Loading PDF copies of web pages to the pCloud folder

Google Street View is an example of a web page which is thought to contain reliable historical information from an authoritative source - it is not an official source (such as Ordnance Survey) but it is a well-known private source which is independent (assuming your legal dispute is not with Google itself!) and believed to be accurate. But, depending on what your dispute is about, you might want to take copies of pages of other websites. For example if you have a dispute with a supplier from whom you have ordered goods or services online you might want to take a copy of the details displayed on their website (taking a copy at the actual time you ordered would be the ideal but taking a copy as soon as you think of it has at least some value). If, in the past, you have saved a copy of the website on your computer then you will have already loaded it to a folder on pCloud in the "Load other relevant files on your computer to the pCloud folder" step above. But if you are making a copy now, proceed as follows:- 

Make a PDF copy of the website using the Print function on Chrome on a Windows computer as shown in the examples here. Give the PDF a name commencing with the date the copy was taken - e.g.

2019-02-26 Webpage www.brownandsmith.co.uk/home

and load the PDF to the folder on pCloud.

You may be thinking that instead of doing the above it would be easier just to send me a URL link to the web page but there are good reasons why you need to create a PDF, and load that to the pCloud folder (which you have previously given me a share link to) rather than send me a link to the website page. One reason is that, even though you may not be thinking of litigation at this stage, litigation at some point is always a possibility and you need to make sure that you have your own copies of all relevant web pages because their contents may change in the future. Also I need to be sure of what you are providing for me to look at - if you just send a link the page linked to may have other links and so on ad infinitum: you need to provide PDF copies of what the particular pages you are referring to contained when you looked at them.  


Disclaimer

The information on this page about specific computer techniques is provided for information purposes only. Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate and up to date at the time it was written but no responsibility for its accuracy, or for any consequences of relying on it, is assumed by me. Any sample screen layouts are based on the version of software current when the screen shot was taken and may be different now. You should satisfy yourself, before using any of the techniques, software or services described, that the techniques are appropriate for your purposes and that the software or service is reliable.

This page was lasted updated in July 2019. Disclaimer